Like its 718 Cayman GT4 RS sister model, the new Porsche 718 Spyder RS (718 Spyder RS: Fuel consumption* combined (WLTP) 13.0 l/100 km, CO₂ emissions* combined (WLTP) 294 g/km, CO2 class G ) makes no secret of its high performance. A distinctive rear spoiler in the classic ducktail style, NACA ducts in the front bonnet, air intakes behind the soft top – the Spyder RS is unmistakably the range-topping performer among open-top 718 models.

The striking rear spoiler on the 718 Spyder RS makes an immediate impression. Porsche first used this feature in the 911 Carrera RS 2.7 in 1972. Today, the legendary sports and racing car is a cult icon. The engineers of the Spyder RS deliberately dispensed with the adjustable wings of the Cayman GT4 RS. In a car without a fixed roof, aerodynamic development is less about the maximum downforce and more about achieving optimal driving stability and balance in all driving conditions – with or without the top. With the optional Weissach Package, there is also an additional Gurney flap on the rear spoiler.

Optimal aerodynamic balance

The front lip of the 718 Spyder RS is the perfect complement to the aerodynamically revised rear: it’s shorter than on the Cayman GT4 RS for the purpose of balance. That aside, the front end is identical on both RS models. On top of the wings are wheel arch vents with slats. These slats, a motorsport-derived design, were first used in series production in the 991-generation Porsche 911 GT3 RS. Particularly at high speeds, they reduce the excess pressure in the wheel arch caused by the rotation of the wheels. This is effective in preventing lift on the front axle. Two NACA air intakes give the lightweight bonnet its characteristic appearance. The air intakes were originally developed by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) — the predecessor of the NASA space agency — and combine two properties in the 718 Spyder RS that are normally mutually exclusive: they improve brake cooling but without impairing the drag coefficient of the vehicle, which is why NACA air intakes are also frequently used on racing cars. In the front bumper and ahead of the CFRP front bonnet, there is a central air opening through which air is channelled out of the car. The front apron features sideblades that guide air effectively around the front wheels.

Aerodynamically optimised underbody

The air flowing under the Spyder RS is greatly accelerated via new deflectors on the fully clad underbody, creating a vacuum at the rear. This reduces lift on the rear axle.

There are also two further NACA air intakes in the underbody of the Spyder RS. They are also used for cooling — the main beneficiary being the gasoline particulate filter — without a negative impact on the car’s overall drag coefficient. Finally, the air flowing under the car exits through a rear diffuser. This component has been taken from the 718 Spyder () and improved using aerodynamic fins on the sides. They provide additional stabilisation of the airflow at the rear and improve grip.

Lightweight design for enhanced agility

One classic roadster virtue was particularly important to the engineers as they developed the 718 Spyder RS: lightweight design throughout. Measured according to DIN standards — a 90 per cent full tank but without a driver — the 718 Spyder RS weighs in at 1,410 kg. Thus, each one of the engine’s 500 PS is responsible for accelerating just 2.82 kg (3.83 kg/kW). To achieve this goal, both the front wings and the bonnet are made of carbon fibre-reinforced plastic (CFRP), and bi-xenon lightweight headlights — without a headlight cleaning system — save further weight. Insulation material was dispensed with in some places and the interior is fitted with lightweight carpets. And naturally, no RS model is complete without lightweight door panel trim with textile opener loops and nets for storage compartments.

The uniquely designed lightweight top in the new 718 Spyder RS also offers weight advantages.  Covered in a single-layer fabric, the manually operated hood is amazingly compact and consists of two parts: a ‘sunshield’ and a weather guard. Both are entirely removable and can be stowed either together or singly in the vehicle. The sun sail alone can also be used as a ‘Bimini top’ thereby protecting the driver and front passenger from intense sunlight. In this case, the passenger compartment remains largely open to the side and behind the passengers.

40 kilograms lighter than the 718 Spyder

In bad weather, an additional weather guard with a glass rear window can be fitted to provide effective protection against rain when the side windows are closed. The entire roof, including mechanical parts, weighs just 18.3 kg. That’s 7.6 kg less than the 718 Spyder and 16.5 kg less than in the 718 Boxster ([ci:Model-Range-718-Boxster). Drivers who wish to shave an additional eight kilograms from the weight of the vehicle can leave the top at home entirely, weather allowing. The bottom line: in its lightest configuration, the Porsche 718 Spyder RS weighs 40 kilograms less than the 718 Spyder with PDK.

With the optional Weissach Package, there are significant weight savings in the car’s unsprung mass.  The optional 20-inch forged magnesium wheels are 10 kg lighter than the standard forged aluminium wheels. On the exterior, various elements feature a visible carbon-weave finish, setting the Weissach Package apart visually. This lightweight material is most noticeable on the front luggage compartment lid but can also be found on the process air intakes, the cooling air intakes and the upper shells of the exterior mirrors, as well as the central brake light in the rear engine cover, on the rollover bars and on the Gurney flap. In addition, the stainless steel sports exhaust system in the 718 Spyder RS with the Weissach Package features tailpipes made of titanium.

New paint colour Vanadium Grey Metallic

Nine standard colours are available for the body of the new 718 Spyder RS: White, Black, Guards Red and Racing Yellow as solid colours, as well as Gentian Blue Metallic and GT Silver Metallic, plus the new Vanadium Grey Metallic – a colour developed specifically for the 718 Spyder RS. The special colours Arctic Grey, Shark Blue and Ruby Star Neo complete the palette.

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Consumption data

718 Boxster models

WLTP*
  • 12.7 – 8.9 l/100 km
  • 288 – 201 g/km
  • G Class

718 Boxster models

Fuel consumption* / Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined (WLTP) 12.7 – 8.9 l/100 km
CO₂ emissions* combined (WLTP) 288 – 201 g/km
CO₂ class G

718 Cayman GT4 RS

WLTP*
  • 13 l/100 km
  • 295 g/km
  • G Class

718 Cayman GT4 RS

Fuel consumption* / Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined (WLTP) 13 l/100 km
CO₂ emissions* combined (WLTP) 295 g/km
CO₂ class G

718 Spyder RS

WLTP*
  • 13 l/100 km
  • 294 g/km
  • G Class

718 Spyder RS

Fuel consumption* / Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined (WLTP) 13 l/100 km
CO₂ emissions* combined (WLTP) 294 g/km
CO₂ class G

911 Carrera GTS

WLTP*
  • 11.0 – 10.5 l/100 km
  • 251 – 239 g/km
  • G Class

911 Carrera GTS

Fuel consumption* / Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined (WLTP) 11.0 – 10.5 l/100 km
CO₂ emissions* combined (WLTP) 251 – 239 g/km
CO₂ class G

911 GT3

WLTP*
  • 13.0 – 12.9 l/100 km
  • 294 – 293 g/km
  • G Class

911 GT3

Fuel consumption* / Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined (WLTP) 13.0 – 12.9 l/100 km
CO₂ emissions* combined (WLTP) 294 – 293 g/km
CO₂ class G

911 GT3 RS

WLTP*
  • 13.2 l/100 km
  • 299 g/km
  • G Class

911 GT3 RS

Fuel consumption* / Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined (WLTP) 13.2 l/100 km
CO₂ emissions* combined (WLTP) 299 g/km
CO₂ class G

911 S/T

WLTP*
  • 13.8 l/100 km
  • 313 g/km
  • G Class

911 S/T

Fuel consumption* / Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined (WLTP) 13.8 l/100 km
CO₂ emissions* combined (WLTP) 313 g/km
CO₂ class G

Cayenne GTS

WLTP*
  • 13.3 – 12.6 l/100 km
  • 303 – 287 g/km
  • G Class

Cayenne GTS

Fuel consumption* / Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined (WLTP) 13.3 – 12.6 l/100 km
CO₂ emissions* combined (WLTP) 303 – 287 g/km
CO₂ class G

Macan 4S Electric

WLTP*
  • 20.7 - 17.7 kWh/100 km
  • 0 g/km
  • A Class

Macan 4S Electric

Fuel consumption* / Emissions*
Electric power consumption* combined (WLTP) 20.7 - 17.7 kWh/100 km
CO₂ emissions* combined (WLTP) 0 g/km
CO₂ class A

Macan Electric

WLTP*
  • 19.8 - 17.0 kWh/100 km
  • 0 g/km
  • A Class

Macan Electric

Fuel consumption* / Emissions*
Electric power consumption* combined (WLTP) 19.8 - 17.0 kWh/100 km
CO₂ emissions* combined (WLTP) 0 g/km
CO₂ class A

Macan Turbo Electric

WLTP*
  • 20.7 – 18.8 kWh/100 km
  • 0 g/km
  • A Class

Macan Turbo Electric

Fuel consumption* / Emissions*
Electric power consumption* combined (WLTP) 20.7 – 18.8 kWh/100 km
CO₂ emissions* combined (WLTP) 0 g/km
CO₂ class A

Panamera GTS

WLTP*
  • 12.7 – 12.0 l/100 km
  • 288 – 274 g/km
  • G Class

Panamera GTS

Fuel consumption* / Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined (WLTP) 12.7 – 12.0 l/100 km
CO₂ emissions* combined (WLTP) 288 – 274 g/km
CO₂ class G

Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid

WLTP*
  • 1.6 – 1.4 l/100 km
  • 11.5 – 10.8 l/100 km
  • 29.3 – 27.4 kWh/100 km
  • 38 – 26 g/km
  • B Class
  • B Class
  • G Class

Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid

Fuel consumption* / Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined (WLTP) 1.6 – 1.4 l/100 km
Fuel consumption with depleted battery combined 11.5 – 10.8 l/100 km
Electric power consumption* combined (WLTP) 29.3 – 27.4 kWh/100 km
CO₂ emissions* combined (WLTP) 38 – 26 g/km
CO₂ class B
CO₂ class weighted combined B
CO₂ class with depleted battery G

Taycan Turbo GT with Weissach package

WLTP*
  • 21.3 – 20.6 kWh/100 km
  • 0 g/km
  • A Class

Taycan Turbo GT with Weissach package

Fuel consumption* / Emissions*
Electric power consumption* combined (WLTP) 21.3 – 20.6 kWh/100 km
CO₂ emissions* combined (WLTP) 0 g/km
CO₂ class A