Research and development

Change is occurring at breakneck pace – and the Porsche Research and Development team gives it a structure. It fuses the brand’s traditional roots with future technologies, creating fascinating and emotionally appealing products like the new Taycan.

For Porsche, the last year was all about the Taycan, the fully electric sports car that signalled the beginning of a new era for the sports car manufacturer. There were also a number of additional important introductions.

New Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport with organic-fibre body parts

Three years after the debut of the first Cayman GT4 Clubsport, Porsche unveiled its successor. For the first time, this mid-engine production racing car is available in two variants as standard: the "Trackday" model is pitched at ambitious amateur racing drivers, while the "Competition" model is intended for national and international events.

The focus during its development was on the sustainable use of raw materials – in addition to improved handling and faster lap times. As the first series-produced racing car, it features body parts made from an organic fibre composite. The natural fibre mix featured in the driver and co-driver doors and the rear wing – are made of an organic fibre mix, which are sourced primarily from agricultural by-products such as flax or hemp fibres and feature similar properties to carbon fibre in terms of weight and stiffness.

Powering the 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport is a 3.8-litre six-cylinder boxer engine with 313 kW (425 PS). Compared to its predecessor, this represents a 29 kW (40 PS) increase in performance. Power is transferred to the rear wheels via a Porsche dual-clutch 6-speed gearbox with six gears and mechanical rear-axle differential lock. At 1,320 kilograms, the 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport is a real lightweight and comes with a welded-in safety cage, a racing bucket seat and a six-point harness as standard.

718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport, 2020, Porsche AG
New 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport featuring organic fibre body parts

As the basic variant, the “Trackday” is aimed at amateur drivers who want to take part in private racetrack and Clubsport events without major effort or outlay. The non-road-homologated car can be serviced at all Porsche Centres. The “Competition” model features a raft of details relevant for racing, among them three-stage adjustable shock absorbers, an adjustable brake balance system, an integrated air jack system and the quick-release racing steering wheel from the 911 GT3 R.

Opening up: the Porsche 911 Cabriolet

Porsche unveiled the new 911 Cabriolet to the public in early January 2019. This open-top 911 was available as the 911 Carrera S with rear-wheel drive and as the 911 Carrera 4S with all-wheel drive upon its release. The new version of the iconic sports car includes all the innovative features of the coupé, along with cabriolet-specific advanced features such as new hydraulics which get the fully automatic soft top opened and closed more quickly than ever. This top, which boasts structurally integrated panel bow magnesium elements that reliably prevent the roof from raising at high speeds, can be opened or closed while driving at up to 50 km/h. The new roof hydraulics cut the opening time to around 12 seconds, while an electrically extendable wind deflector takes the edge off the breeze at the back.

Both cabriolets rely on a 2,981 cm3 charged six-cylinder boxer engine with 331 kW (450 PS; 911 Carrera S Cabriolet: Fuel consumption combined 10.1-9.8 l/100 km; CO2 emissions 230-223 g/km; 911 Carrera 4S Cabriolet: Fuel consumption combined 10.2-9.9 l/100 km; CO2 emissions 234-225 g/km) at 6,500 rpm and 530 Nm torque between 2,300 and 5,000 rpm. Power transmission is handled by an 8-speed dual-clutch gearbox. The 911 Carrera S accelerates from zero to 100 km/h in 3.9 seconds (with optional Sport Chrono package: 3.7 seconds) and can reach a speed of up to 306 km/h. The 911 Carrera 4S attains a top speed of 304 km/h and goes from zero to 100 km/h in 3.8 seconds (with optional Sport Chrono package: 3.6 seconds).

911 Carrera 4S Cabriolet, 2020, Porsche AG
911 Cabriolet

Striking appearance: the Porsche Cayenne Coupé

In March 2019, an even sportier car was added to the third generation of the successful Cayenne range – the Cayenne Coupé. It includes all the technical highlights of the current Cayenne, but has a more dynamic design and new technical details that position it as more progressive, athletic and emotional. Highlights include a sharper design with a totally unique rear end, an adaptive rear spoiler, a rear bench with the characteristics of two individual seats and two roof concepts: the standard panoramic fixed-glass roof and the optional carbon roof.

With its adaptive roof spoiler, the current Cayenne Turbo was the first SUV to feature this type of active aerodynamics. The new Cayenne Coupé continues to lead the way in this respect: on each Cayenne Coupé, a fixed roof spoiler is combined with a new adaptive rear spoiler as part of Porsche Active Aerodynamics (PAA). The spoiler is harmoniously integrated into the model’s silhouette and extends by 135 millimetres at speeds at or greater than 90 km/h, increasing the contact pressure on the rear axle while PAA simultaneously enhances efficiency.

Two high-performance engines were available to begin with at market launch. Featuring a six-cylinder turbocharged engine and 3.0-litre displacement, the Cayenne Coupé delivers 250 kW (340 PS; Fuel consumption combined 9.4 – 9.3 l/100 km; CO2 emissions 215 – 212 g/km) and a maximum torque of 450 Nm. The Sport Chrono package fitted in series-production cars achieves the standard sprint from zero to 100 km/h in 6.0 seconds, with the optional lightweight sports packages cutting this figure to 5.9 seconds. Top speed is 243 km/h. With a four-litre V8 engine featuring biturbo charging, 404 kW (550 PS; Fuel consumption combined 11.4 – 11.3 l/100 km; CO2 emissions 261 – 258 g/km) and maximum torque of 770 Nm, the Cayenne Turbo Coupé goes from zero to 100 km/h in 3.9 seconds from a standing start and has a top speed of 286 km/h.

Cayenne Coupé

In May 2019, Porsche unveiled the Cayenne S Coupé as a further variant featuring a 2.9-litre V6 engine with biturbo charging and 324 kW (440 PS; Fuel consumption combined 9.4 – 9.2 l/100 km; CO2 emissions 216 – 212 g/km). Its maximum torque of 550 Nm guarantees powerful acceleration. The SUV coupe accelerates from a standing start to 100 km/h in 5.0 seconds in combination with the standard Sport Chrono package. This figure drops to 4.9 seconds with the three optional lightweight sports packages. Top speed is 263 km/h.

The Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid Coupé followed in August as the new flagship model. Its system output of 500 kW (680 PS; Fuel consumption combined 3.9 – 3.7 l/100 km; CO2 emissions 90 – 85 g/km; electricity consumption (combined) 19.6 – 18.7 kWh/100 km) and maximum system torque of 900 Nm enable it to accelerate from zero to 100 km/h in 3.8 seconds and to reach a top speed of 295 km/h. On top of this, the hybrid range from Porsche now includes the new Cayenne E-Hybrid Coupé boasting a system output of 340 kW (462 PS; Fuel consumption combined 3.2 – 3.1 l/100 km; CO2 emissions 75 – 72 g/km; electricity consumption (combined) 18.7 – 17.7 kWh/100 km), torque of 700 Nm and an electric range of up to 43 kilometres.

Limited-edition Porsche 911 Speedster with 375 kW (510 PS; Fuel consumption combined 13.8 l/100 km; CO2 emissions 317 g/km)

This new Speedster combines the demand of a puristic, driver-oriented car with motorsport technology suitable for everyday use. Many of its details are based on the 911 R (2016) and 911 GT3. Through its characteristic lightweight convertible top compartment lid featuring “double-bubble” streamliners, the Speedster establishes a visual bridge to its own history – to the forebear of all Porsche sports cars, the 356 “No. 1” Roadster from 1948. The limited-edition new 911 Speedster is also reminiscent of this car. Production of a run of exactly 1,948 units began in mid 2019 at the main plant in Zuffenhausen.

A weight-saving roof structure replaces the basic tonneau cover of the concept car, with the convertible top taking no effort to operate. Lightweight design also dictates other body components of the Speedster. The carbon­fibre composite bonnet – which weighs in two kilograms lighter than on the 911 GT3 – and the carbon-fibre composite wings originate from the 911 R. And while the front apron was borrowed from the GT3, the front spoiler lip is a completely new development. Instead of the Talbot mirrors used on the concept car, the production version of the new Speedster features electrically adjustable and heated Sport Design exterior mirrors. The extending, aerodynamically tuned rear spoiler and rear apron have been drawn from the 911 GT3 Touring for the Speedster.

911 Speedster, 2020, Porsche AG
911 Speedster

The heart of the Speedster is adopted from the 911 GT3. The naturally aspirated six-cylinder boxer engine with four-litre displacement peak power of 375 kW (510 PS) at 8,400 rpm, the 911 Speedster accelerates from zero to 100 km/h in 4.0 seconds and reaches a top speed of 310 km/h. Befitting its status as a driver’s car, Porsche only offers the 911 with a manual six-speed sports gearbox. The GT ­philosophy behind the new Speedster is also reflected in its chassis. With its sporty rear­axle steering and dynamic engine mounts, the chassis is based on the technology of the 911 GT3 and 911 R. Control systems such as Porsche Torque Vectoring (PTV), Porsche Stability Management (PSM) and PASM with sports tuning – including lowering by 25 millimetres – have been precisely adapted to the new requirements.

High performance: the Porsche 718 Spyder and 718 Cayman GT4

In June, Porsche unveiled the new 718 Spyder and the 718 Cayman GT4 – a pair of par­ticularly emotive and powerful flagship models at the very top of the line-up. At the heart of both models is the new four-litre six-cylinder boxer engine. The naturally aspirated engine is based on the same family as the turbocharged engines in the current 911 Carrera series. This new high-revving unit generates 309 kW (420 PS; Fuel consumption combined 10.9 l/100 km; CO2 emissions 249 g/km) – 35 PS more than in the previous GT4. The third generation of the Spyder has 45 PS more than its predecessor. Peak torque of 420 Nm arrives between 5,000 and 6,800 rpm. Both sports cars are equipped with manual gearboxes and are capable of breaking the 300 km/h barrier: the 718 Spyder has a top speed of 301 km/h, while the 718 Cayman GT4 can reach 304 km/h. Each accelerates from zero to 100 km/h in 4.4 seconds, and engine speed maxes out at 8,000 rpm.

Among the striking features of the 718 Cayman GT4 is the comprehensively improved aerodynamics package. It produces up to 50 per cent more downforce without adversely affecting drag – proof of outstanding efficiency. The aerodynamics of both models benefit enormously from the newly designed single-chamber arch rear silencer: this creates space in the rear section for a functional diffuser, which accounts for a good 30 per cent of the downforce on the rear axle in the 718 Cayman GT4. The fixed rear wing is also marked by its greater efficiency, producing around 20 per cent more downforce than its predecessor. This corresponds to an additional 12 kilograms of downforce at 200 km/h. The front section, which is optimised in the GT style, maintains aerodynamic balance with a large front spoiler lip and air curtains.

The new 718 Spyder is a puristic machine for driving pleasure with a lightweight convertible top that can cope with high speeds. It continues the history of such famous roadsters as the Porsche 550 Spyder and the 718 RS 60 Spyder. Open or closed, it thrills with a captivating silhouette. The top is suitable for everyday use and can be stowed away under the boot lid in just a few steps. Unlike the GT4, the 718 Spyder has a rear spoiler that raises automatically at 120 km/h. Thanks to the functional diffuser, it is the first model in the Boxster family to generate aerodynamic downforce on the rear axle.

718 Cayman GT4, 718 Spyder, l-r, 2020, Porsche AG
718 Spyder und 718 Cayman GT4

Both feature a high-performance GT chassis with superior cornering dynamics. The Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) damping system with 30 millimetres lower suspension lowers the centre of gravity and improves lateral dynamics. Porsche Torque Vectoring (PTV) and a mechanical rear differential lock further enhance longitudinal and lateral dynamics, cornering performance and driving pleasure. The GT4 also comes with the option of a "Clubsport" package, which includes a rear steel roll bar, a handheld fire extinguisher and a six-point harness on the driver’s side.

The new element of the overall package are the ultra-high-performance (UHP) tyres which are designed for the 718 Spyder and which make the 718 Cayman GT4 fly on the Nürburgring Nordschleife, setting new records: its lap time on this legendary 20.6-kilometre racetrack was over 10 seconds faster than its predecessor.

Entry-level models: Porsche 911 Carrera Coupé and 911 Carrera Cabriolet

Porsche expanded its eighth-generation range with the 911 Carrera at the end of July 2019. This new sports car, which was launched as a coupé and cabriolet, generates 283 kW (385 PS; 911 Carrera: Fuel consumption combined 9.4 l/100 km; CO2 emissions 215 g/km; 911 Carrera Cabriolet: Fuel consumption combined 9.6 l/100 km; CO2 emissions 218 g/km) from its 3.0-litre six-cylinder boxer engine with biturbo charging. The Carrera is the entry-level 911 model and delivers 11 kW (15 PS) more than its predecessor.

911 Carrera Cabriolet, 2020, Porsche AG
911 Carrera Coupé

As with the 911 Carrera S, the engine, chassis and brakes are designed for exclusive sportiness. The 3.0-litre six-cylinder boxer engine of the 911 Carrera generates power largely through the smaller wheel diameters of the turbines and compressors that feature in the new turbochargers. Power transmission is handled by the new eight-speed dual-clutch gearbox (PDK). This enables the 911 Carrera Coupé to accelerate from zero to 100 km/h in 4.2 seconds, with a top speed of 293 km/h. The optional Sport Chrono package shaves a further 0.2 seconds off the sprint. Combined fuel consumption (NEDC-correlated) of the Coupé is 9.0 l/100 km, while the Cabriolet records 9.2 l/100 km. The driving dynamics set-up includes 235/40 ZR tyres on 19-inch alloy wheels on the front axle. The rear axle features 20-inch wheels with 295/35 ZR tyres. Deceleration is provided on both axles by 330-millimetre brake discs with black monobloc four-piston fixed callipers.

In at the top: Porsche Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid and Turbo S E-Hybrid Coupé

In late August 2019, the Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid and the Turbo S E-Hybrid Coupé were introduced as the new top models in the Cayenne series. They draw their system output of 500 kW (680 PS; Fuel consumption combined 3.9 – 3.7 l/100 km; CO2 emissions 90 – 85 g/km; electricity consumption (combined) 19.6 – 18.7 kWh/100 km) from the intelligent interaction of a four-litre V8 engine (404 kW/550 PS) and an electric motor integrated into the eight-speed Tiptronic S gearbox (100 kW/­136 PS). The maximum system torque of 900 Nm is already available just above the idling speed. Both models accelerate from zero to 100 km/h in 3.8 seconds and reach a top speed of 295 km/h. This exceptional performance is matched by a high level of efficiency: the Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid and Turbo S E-Hybrid Coupé can drive for up to 40 kilometres with zero emissions. The average NEDC consumption is 3.9 to 3.7 l/100 km (fuel) and 19.6 to 18.7 kWh/100 km (electric).

Like all Porsche plug-in hybrids, the new top-of-the-range model in the Cayenne family is also one of the sportiest cars in the premium segment. In the Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid models, the electric motor is located between the V8 engine and the eight-speed Tiptronic S gearbox. The two motors are interconnected via a separating clutch inside the hybrid ­module. In “E-Power” driving mode, the electric motor can single-handedly propel the car up to a maximum speed of 135 km/h. It can also be used in the other modes for an additional power boost. These modes can be selected via the standard Sport Chrono package (“Hybrid”, “Auto”, “Sport” and “Sport Plus”). Porsche has taken this boost strategy from the 918 Spyder supercar.

Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid, 2020, Porsche AG
Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid

The lithium-ion battery is installed underneath the load compartment floor and has a cap­acity of 14.1 kWh. The high-voltage battery can be fully charged within 2.4 hours via the standard 7.2 kW on-board AC charger when using a 400-volt connection with a 16-amp fuse. Charging takes six hours from a conventional domestic socket with a rating of 230 volts and 10 amps.

Porsche Macan Turbo: flagship model with higher output and lower consumption

The Porsche Macan Turbo has taken over the top spot among compact SUV sports cars. The new six-cylinder biturbo engine – which Porsche already uses for the Cayenne and Panamera models – delivers 324 kW (440 PS; Fuel consumption combined 9.8 l/100 km; CO2 emissions 224 g/km), equating to 10 per cent more power output than its predecessor with 20 per cent less displacement. With the optional Sport Chrono package, the car can go from zero to 100 km/h in 4.3 seconds – three-10ths faster than before. Top speed is 270 km/h – an increase of 4 km/h.

The 2.9-litre engine delivers 29 kW (40 PS) more than the 3.6-litre six-cylinder turbo in its predecessor plus maximum torque of 550 Nm between 1,800 and 5,600 rpm. Power transmission is provided by the seven-speed dual-clutch gearbox (PDK) and Porsche Traction Management (PTM) all-wheel drive. NEDC consumption stands at 9.8 l/100 km.

Macan Turbo, 2020, Porsche AG
Macan Turbo

The new Macan Turbo comes with the Porsche Surface Coated Brake (PSCB) as standard to match the excellent driving dynamics. Optional height-adjustable air suspension with optimised rolling pistons and new shock absorber hydraulics, Porsche Torque Vectoring Plus (PTV Plus) and the Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake (PCCB) are available for a further increase in dynamics. The 20-inch Macan Turbo wheels come as standard.

Porsche Taycan: sustainably redesigned sports car

Porsche presented its first all-electric sports car – the Taycan – in September 2019, thus marking the start of a new era for the company and the continued expansion of its offering in terms of electromobility. This four-door sports saloon is a unique package, combining typical Porsche performance and connectivity with everyday usability. The first models in the new series are the Taycan Turbo S and Taycan Turbo. They are at the cutting edge of Porsche E-Performance and are among the most ­powerful production models currently offered by the sports car manufacturer. The Taycan 4S was subsequently introduced as the third version of this sports saloon in mid October 2019. In late 2020, the company plans to ­unveil the Taycan Cross Turismo as the first derivative.

The flagship Turbo S version of the Taycan generates up to 560 kW (761 PS; combined power consumption 26.9 kWh/100 km; combined CO2 emissions 0 g/km) overboost power in combination with Launch Control, and the Taycan Turbo up to 500 kW (680 PS; combined power consumption 26.0 kWh/100 km; combined CO2 emissions 0 g/km). The Taycan Turbo S accelerates from zero to 100 km/h in 2.8 seconds, while the Taycan Turbo completes this sprint in 3.2 seconds. In terms of range, the Turbo S can cover up to 412 kilometres and the Turbo as much as 450 kilometres (according to WLTP in each case). The top speed of both all-wheel drive models is 260 km/h.

The Taycan 4S is available with two battery sizes: the Performance Battery generates up to 390 kW (530 PS; combined power consumption 24.6 kWh/100 km; combined CO2 emissions 0 g/km), while the Performance Battery Plus delivers up to 420 kW (571 PS; combined power consumption 25.6 kWh/100 km; combined CO2 emissions 0 g/km). A single-deck Performance Battery with a ­total capacity of 79.2 kWh is standard, while the two-deck Performance Battery Plus (total capacity 93.4 kWh) – familiar from the Taycan Turbo S and Taycan Turbo – is available as an option. Power output and range vary accordingly. With the Performance Battery, the Taycan 4S generates up to 390 kW (530 PS) overboost power; equipped with the Performance Battery Plus, it delivers up to 420 kW (571 PS). Both variants of the Taycan 4S accelerate from zero to 100 km/h in 4.0 seconds. Top speed is also 250 km/h in both cases. The range is up to 407 kilometres with the Performance Battery, extending as high as 463 kilometres with the Performance Battery Plus (in accordance with WLTP in each case). Maximum charging power (peak) is 225 kW (Performance Battery) and 270 kW (Performance Battery Plus).

Taycan 4S, 2019, Porsche AG
Taycan 4S

The Taycan is the first production car with a system voltage of 800 volts instead of the usual 400 volts for electric models. This is a particular advantage for Taycan drivers on the road: in just over five minutes, the battery can be recharged using direct current (DC) from the high-power charging network for a range of up to 100 kilometres (according to WLTP). The charging time for 5 to 80 per cent SoC (state of charge) is 22.5 minutes for charging under ideal conditions and the maximum charging power (peak) is up to 270 kW. The overall capacity of the Performance Battery Plus is 93.4 kWh. Taycan drivers can comfortably charge their cars with up to 11 kW of alternating current (AC) at home.

With its clean, puristic design, the Taycan signals the beginning of a new era. And with a Cd value from 0.22, the aerodynamically optimised basic shape makes a decisive contribution to low energy consumption and thus long range.

The role of the Taycan as a technology leader is reflected in almost every detail, even including the interior. All user interfaces have been completely redesigned for the Taycan. The number of traditional hardware controls, such as switches and buttons, has been greatly reduced. Instead, control is intelligent and intuitive – via touch operation or the voice control function that responds to the command “Hey Porsche”. With the Taycan, Porsche offers an entirely leather-free interior for the first time. Interiors made from innovative recycled materials underscore the sustainable concept of this electric sports car. “Foot garages” – recesses in the battery in the rear footwell – ensure sitting comfort in the rear and enable the low vehicle height typical of sports cars.

All three Taycan models feature two exceptionally efficient electric motors, one on the front axle and one on the rear axle, thus making the cars all-wheel drive. Both the range and the continuous power of the drive benefit from the high efficiency of the permanently excited synchronous machines. The gearbox and pulse-controlled inverter are each combined into a compact drive module. The modules have the highest power density (kW per litre of package space) of all electric power trains currently on the market. A special feature of the electric motors is the hairpin winding of the stator coils. This technology makes it possible to incorporate more copper in the stator, increasing power output and torque while maintaining the same component volume.

The two-speed gearbox installed on the rear axle is an innovation developed by Porsche. First gear gives the Taycan even more acceleration from a standing start, while second gear features a long gear ratio to ensure high efficiency and equally high power reserves – even at very high speeds.

Porsche uses a centrally networked control system for the Taycan chassis. Integrated Porsche 4D Chassis Control analyses and synchronises all chassis systems in real time. The innovative chassis systems include adaptive air suspension with three-chamber technology featuring Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) electronic damper control and the Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control Sport (PDCC Sport) electromechanical roll stabilisation system featuring Porsche Torque Vectoring Plus (PTV Plus). The all-wheel drive control with two electric motors and the recuperation system are unique. At up to 265 kW, the potential recuperation power is significantly higher than that of competitors. Driving tests have shown that around 90 per cent of everyday braking is performed by the electric motors alone – without the hydraulic wheel brakes being activated.

The profile of the different driving modes essentially follows the same philosophy as in other Porsche model series. This is supplemented by special settings which enable optimum use of the purely electric drive. Four driving modes are available: “Range”, “Normal”, “Sport” and “Sport Plus”. In addition, individual systems can be configured as required in “Individual” mode.

New addition: the 911 Carrera with all-wheel drive

The Coupé and Cabriolet models were added to the eighth-generation 911 Carrera 4 range in September 2019. Like the rear-wheel drive 911 Carrera models, the new 911 Carrera 4 Coupé and 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet are powered by a biturbo three-litre six-cylinder boxer engine that generates 283 kW (385 PS; 911 Carrera 4: Fuel consumption combined 9.6 l/100 km; CO2 emissions 218 g/km; 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet: Fuel consumption combined 9.7 l/100 km; CO2 emissions 221 g/km) at 6,500 rpm. The maximum torque of 450 Nm is available across a broad speed range from 1,950 to 5,000 rpm, thereby boosting both performance and everyday suitability.

911 Carrera 4, 2020, Porsche AG
911 Carrera 4

Featuring an eight-speed dual-clutch gearbox (PDK), the 911 Carrera 4 Coupé accelerates from zero to 100 km/h in 4.2 seconds. The 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet completes the sprint in 4.4 seconds, with the optional Sport Chrono package shaving a further 0.2 seconds off this time. All acceleration values are thus 0.1 seconds better than in the predecessor. Top speed is 291 km/h for the all-wheel drive Coupé and 289 km/h for the all-wheel drive Cabriolet.

As with the 911 Carrera 4S models, the improved performance of the 911 Carrera 4 models is down to enhanced front-axle drive. The clutch and differential unit is now water-cooled and features reinforced clutch plates to increase durability and load capacity. Increased actuating torques at the clutch improve the latter’s adjustment accuracy and thus the capability of the driven front axle. The enhanced front-axle drive with Porsche Traction Management (PTM) promotes increased traction for all road conditions.

Special anniversary model: Porsche Panamera 10 Years Edition

Porsche celebrated the 10th anniversary of the Panamera with a special model. The Panamera 10 Years Edition features particularly extensive standard equipment in terms of comfort and the chassis, and has also been enhanced with exclusive design highlights. For example, the new 21-inch Panamera Sport Design wheels in satin-gloss White Gold Metallic and the “Panamera10” logo on the front doors, also in White Gold Metallic, are exclusive to the special edition models.

Panamera 10 Years Edition, 2020, Porsche AG
Panamera 10 years edition

The anniversary logo can also be found in the interior on the front-passenger trim panel and on the door entry guards. The interior is designed in black partial leather, with decorative stitching in White Gold creating a particularly high-quality impression.

New Porsche GTS model: the sportiest Macan

Porsche has supplemented the Macan line with an emphatically sporty model: the new Macan GTS was launched with a powerful engine, performance-oriented chassis, char­acteristic design and upgraded equipment. The 2.9-litre V6 biturbo engine delivers 280 kW (380 PS; Fuel consumption combined 9.6 l/100 km; CO2 emissions 218 g/km) – 15 kW (20 PS) more than its predecessor. Combined with the newly calibrated dual-clutch gearbox PDK and the optional Sport Chrono package, the Macan GTS sprints from zero to 100 km/h in 4.7 seconds – making it three-10ths faster than before. It has a top speed of 261 km/h.

Macan GTS, 2019, Porsche AG
Macan GTS

In combination with the specially designed Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) electronic damper control, the chassis – which has been lowered by 15 millimetres – provides even greater lateral dynamics. The optional adaptive air suspension lowers the chassis a further 10 millimetres. Together with the standard 20-inch RS Spyder Design wheels and the impressive brake system, the new Macan GTS makes an impression with the agility and suddenness of a true sports car. The Porsche Surface Coated Brake (PSCB) with tungsten carbide coating and the Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake (PCCB) are available as options. The new Macan GTS also underscores its unique sportiness with numerous striking chassis elements which, true to the GTS style, are painted black or darkened.

Exclusive special model: 718 Cayman GT4 Cup Edition

To mark the 15th anniversary of the customer and Clubsport series “Porsche Sports Cup” Germany, Porsche offered a special limited-edition model featuring a racing design.

718 Cayman GT4 Cup Edition, 2020, Porsche AG
718 Cayman GT4 Sports Cup Edition

Designated the 718 Cayman GT4 Sports Cup Edition, it was only available for a brief period. The sporty and exclusive model celebrated its debut at the “Sportscar Together Day” held at the Hockenheimring on 12 and 13 October 2019. This spectacular event for Porsche fans celebrated both the opening of the new Porsche Experience Centre Hockenheimring and the season finale of the Porsche Sports Cup.

End of production: the last 991-generation Porsche 911 rolls off the production line

One of the biggest upgrades in the history of the 911 was unveiled in 2011: for the 991, nearly 90 per cent of all components were newly constructed or underwent significant development. Thanks to the lightweight body in the novel aluminium-and-steel composite construction, this iteration of the 911 weighed less than its predecessor for the first time. The chassis – with a wheelbase 100 millimetres longer and new Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control (PDCC) roll stabilisation as an option – set new standards in terms of driving dynamics. In spring 2012, the cabriolet followed up with another innovation: when closed, the panel bow top with magnesium elements gave the roof the curvature of a coupé to an extent not seen before. The silhouette remained intact even at high speeds. The introduction of the new 911 Targa in late 2012 was equally impressive: just like the legendary original, the new Targa model featured the wide panel in place of the B-pillars. But now, at the push of a button, the front part of the roof could be automatically moved and placed in the rear.

The first active aerodynamics of the 911 Turbo and the introduction of turbo engines with particulate filters for the 911 Carrera models continued the eruption of innovations in the 991 generation. Further highlights came in 2013 with the exclusively equipped 50th­anniversary edition limited to 1,963 models; the 911 R with aspirated engine (368 kW/500 PS) in 2016; and the sportily trimmed 911 T, the high-performance 911 GT3 sports car with touring package and the one millionth 911 in 2017. That same year, Porsche Exclusive Manufaktur introduced the 911 Turbo S Exclusive Series.

In summer 2017, the most powerful and fastest 911 with racing technology to date – the 911 GT2 RS – took its 515 kW (700 PS; Fuel consumption combined 11.8 l/100 km; CO2 emissions 269 g/km) to the streets. Its naturally aspirated counterpart followed a few months later in the form of the 911 GT3 RS with racing chassis and 4.0-litre engine delivering 382 kW (520 PS; Fuel consumption combined 13.2 l/100 km; CO2 emissions 303 g/km).

Right on time for the 70th birthday of Porsche sports cars, the 911 Speedster – introduced as a concept car in 2018 and available from 2019 – embodied the original virtues of the company: lightweight construction, efficiency, purism and driving pleasure. Each of these virtues were represented by the 4.0-litre 375 kW (510 PS) engine, the six-speed manual gearbox and a high-performance sports chassis. The two-seater was not only the last derivative of the 991 generation but also, in 2019, was the last of the model series to be produced. Like its forbear and prototype – the Porsche 356 “No. 1” Roadster of 1948 – it will become an ambassador of the rolling museum.

911 Speedster, Production, 2019, Porsche AG
911 Speedster

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Consumption

  • 10.0 - 9.6 l/100km
  • 227 - 220 g/km

911 Carrera S

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 10.0 - 9.6 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 227 - 220 g/km
  • 3.9–3.7 l/100km
  • 90–85 g/km
  • 19.6–18.7 kwh/100km

Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid Coupé

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 3.9–3.7 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 90–85 g/km
Electric power consumptions* combined 19.6–18.7 kwh/100km
  • 13.2 l/100km
  • 303 g/km

911 GT3 RS

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 13.2 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 303 g/km
  • 10.9 l/100km
  • 249 g/km

718 Cayman GT4

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 10.9 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 249 g/km
  • 9.5 – 8.5 l/100km
  • 215 – 193 g/km

911 Carrera T (Typ 991 II)

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 9.5 – 8.5 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 215 – 193 g/km
  • 9.4 – 9.3 l/100km
  • 215 – 212 g/km

Cayenne Coupé

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 9.4 – 9.3 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 215 – 212 g/km
  • 11.4 – 11.3 l/100km
  • 261 – 258 g/km

Cayenne Turbo Coupé

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 11.4 – 11.3 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 261 – 258 g/km
  • 12.9 – 12.7 l/100km
  • 290 – 288 g/km

911 GT3 (Typ 991 II)

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 12.9 – 12.7 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 290 – 288 g/km
  • 9.4 – 9.2 l/100km
  • 216 - 212 g/km

Cayenne S Coupé

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 9.4 – 9.2 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 216 - 212 g/km
  • 3.2–3.1 l/100km
  • 75–72 g/km
  • 18.7–17.7 kwh/100km

Cayenne E-Hybrid Coupé

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 3.2–3.1 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 75–72 g/km
Electric power consumptions* combined 18.7–17.7 kwh/100km
  • 10.1 - 9.7 l/100km
  • 231 - 222 g/km

911 Carrera 4S

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 10.1 - 9.7 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 231 - 222 g/km
  • 8.4 l/100km
  • 194-192 g/km

Panamera 4 10 Years Edition

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 8.4 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 194-192 g/km
  • 11.8 l/100km
  • 269 g/km

911 GT2 RS

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 11.8 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 269 g/km
  • 0 l/100km
  • 0 g/km
  • 26 kwh/100km

Taycan Turbo

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 0 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 0 g/km
Electric power consumptions* combined 26 kwh/100km
  • 10.8 l/100km
  • 246 g/km

718 Cayman GTS 4.0

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 10.8 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 246 g/km
  • 10.1 - 9.8 l/100km
  • 230 - 223 g/km

911 Carrera S Cabriolet

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 10.1 - 9.8 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 230 - 223 g/km
  • 9.6 l/100km
  • 218 g/km

Macan GTS

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 9.6 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 218 g/km
  • 13.8 l/100km
  • 317 g/km

911 Speedster (Typ 991 II)

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 13.8 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 317 g/km
  • 9,6 l/100km
  • 218 g/km

911 Carrera Cabriolet

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 9,6 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 218 g/km
  • 9.6 l/100km
  • 218 g/km

911 Carrera 4

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 9.6 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 218 g/km
  • 10.9 l/100km
  • 249 g/km

718 Spyder

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 10.9 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 249 g/km
  • 3.9–3.7 l/100km
  • 90–85 g/km
  • 19.6–18.7 kwh/100km

Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 3.9–3.7 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 90–85 g/km
Electric power consumptions* combined 19.6–18.7 kwh/100km
  • 9.8 l/100km
  • 224 g/km

Macan Turbo

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 9.8 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 224 g/km
  • 2.7 – 2.6 l/100km
  • 62 – 60 g/km
  • 16.1 – 16.0 kwh/100km

Panamera 4 E-Hybrid 10 Years Edition

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 2.7 – 2.6 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 62 – 60 g/km
Electric power consumptions* combined 16.1 – 16.0 kwh/100km
  • 10.2 - 9.9 l/100km
  • 234 - 225 g/km

911 Carrera 4S Cabriolet

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 10.2 - 9.9 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 234 - 225 g/km
  • 9,4 l/100km
  • 215 g/km

911 Carrera

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 9,4 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 215 g/km
  • 0 l/100km
  • 0 g/km
  • 25.6–24.6 kwh/100km

Taycan 4S

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 0 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 0 g/km
Electric power consumptions* combined 25.6–24.6 kwh/100km
  • 9.7 l/100km
  • 221 g/km

911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 9.7 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 221 g/km
  • 8.8 – 8.7 l/100km
  • 201 – 200 g/km

Panamera 4 Sport Turismo 10 Years Edition

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 8.8 – 8.7 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 201 – 200 g/km
  • 2.9 – 2.8 l/100km
  • 66 – 64 g/km
  • 16.2 – 16.1 kwh/100km

Panamera 4 E-Hybrid Sport Turismo 10 Years Edition

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 2.9 – 2.8 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 66 – 64 g/km
Electric power consumptions* combined 16.2 – 16.1 kwh/100km
  • 11.4 – 11.3 l/100km
  • 261 – 258 g/km

Cayenne Turbo

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 11.4 – 11.3 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 261 – 258 g/km
  • 0 l/100km
  • 0 g/km
  • 26.9 kwh/100km

Taycan Turbo S

Fuel consumption/Emissions*
Fuel consumption* combined 0 l/100km
CO2 emissions* combined 0 g/km
Electric power consumptions* combined 26.9 kwh/100km